Tag Archives: breastfeeding

Lactation Cookies

10 Oct

At a pre-baby class the instructor told us about lactation cookies. I loved the idea that I could eat cookies while also doing something that would help my baby. I did not want to buy cookies (they can be a little expensive), and the recipes I found online were either unhealthy (but tasty) or had too many ingredients that I could not find at my local grocery store (this recipe includes information about the milk producing properties of the ingredients).

Most women produce enough milk for their child(ren) and supply problems should be discussed with a medical or lactation professional. However, these cookies at most may add a little boost and at least are tasty and have, relatively, healthy ingredients. I made and ate them a lot in the first few months. I think I needed the extra calories and liked having an excuse to eat chocolate.

This recipe is a variation of the second one found on peaceful parenting. I hope you enjoy them!

Easy (almost) Vegan Lactation Cookies

 

Makes 4-5 dozen

Ingredients

1 cup Ground Flax Seed

8 Tbsp. Water

1 1/2 cups Flour

1 tsp. Baking Soda

1 tsp. Salt

4 Tbsp. Brewer’s Yeast

1/2 cup Vegan Butter (I like Earth Balance), melted

1 1/3 cup Brown Sugar

1/2 cup Egg Beater (or 2 eggs or vegan replacement for 2 eggs)

1 tsp. Vanilla

3/4 cup Unsweetened Applesauce

1 1/2 cups Chocolate Chips

1/4 cup Chocolate-covered Raisins (Trader Joe’s are especially tasty)

3 cups Oats

 

Directions

1. Pre-heat oven to 350. Grease baking sheets.

2. Mix flax and water in small bowl. In large bowl mix butter and sugar, add eggs and vanilla, stirring until combined. Stir in flax and water mixture and applesauce. Add flour, baking soda, salt, and brewer’s yeast until well combined. Mix in chocolate, raisins, and oats.

3. Drop rounded by rounded spoonful onto baking sheets. Cook for 12-14 minutes. Transfer to wire rack to cool.

 

 

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Things I was not prepared for #1 – Breastfeeding

5 Oct

While I was pregnant I knew that I would breastfeed my child. The health benefits to the child (eg. reduced risk of SIDS, decreased likeliness of becoming overweight later in life, immune support, etc.) are significant and reason enough for me to choose to nurse. Breastfeeding also offers benefits to mom (eg. increased postpartum weight-loss, reduced risk of developing certain types to cancer [although I believe you need to breastfeed for a cumulative year or more to experience this benefit], etc.) and does not involve the preparation that formula requires, making night feedings slightly easier.

After one week I realized that breastfeeding is an intense choice. I was feeding every hour, and never had a stretch longer than 2 hours for the first month. At almost three months I have a 4-5 hour stretch at night, and feed every 2-3 hours during the day. The books described the bonding that occurs while nursing and encourage just sitting there and enjoying the time with your child. I tried that for a few days, but quickly found that half the time my child is dozing off and not looking into my eyes. Further, as my child prefers being held and worn than laying and sleeping anywhere else feeding is a great time for me to catch up on reading and emails (thanks to the invention of the Kindle and smart phone).

Many people and books also encourage pumping regularly so that your partner, or other caregiver, can give the baby a bottle, allowing mom to sleep (or really do anything besides feed) and the partner/father to bond with the baby. I loved this idea when I was pregnant and was ready with a pump and bottles to start at three weeks (most books and lactation consultants seem to believe that introducing a bottle earlier would create nipple confusion, although there are a LOT of exceptions to that advice).

What I learned as three weeks approached and I was starting to pump is that:

1) milk supply is not established enough to pump in the early weeks/month, so pumping enough for a feeding can take a VERY long time;

2) it requires forethought and careful planning to pump initially (difficult to come by while sleep deprived and recovering from childbirth);

3) babies feed so frequently in the early weeks that making time to pump means giving up time when you could be sleeping; and

4) while your baby is feeding from the bottle you need to pump to maintain your milk supply, which is just as labor and time intensive as feeding your baby.

Finally, I was not prepared for the impact nursing would have on my wardrobe. Everything I wear has to be easy to nurse in, and if I’m planning on going out with my baby I have to wear a top that I can discreetly arrange with one hand under a nursing cover while the other hand is holding a screaming infant. I was so eager to get out of maternity clothes and into my “real” clothes that having another kind of limitation on my clothing choice seemed crushing at first.

And now, time to feed.